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Measurement and perception of sound insulation from 20 Hz between dwellings
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics. Tyréns AB.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8386-2292
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017.
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62843ISBN: 978-91-7583-868-7 (print)ISBN: 978-91-7583-869-4 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62843DiVA: diva2:1086459
Public defence
2017-05-30, F531, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, 971 87 Luleå, 09:30 (English)
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Forskningsfinansiärer:

Sven Tyréns Stiftelse

Formas

Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2017-04-05Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Variations in sound insulation in nominally identical prefabricated lightweight timber constructions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variations in sound insulation in nominally identical prefabricated lightweight timber constructions
2010 (English)In: Building Acoustics, ISSN 1351-010X, Vol. 17, no 2, 91-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variations in sound insulation necessitate higher safety margins to the legal requirements, which results in higher production costs. Increased knowledge about variations leads to lowered costs and better sound quality. In-situ measurements of 30 nominally identical apartments of a lightweight timber construction were performed, to assess and quantify the variations in airborne sound reduction and impact sound pressure level. The construction is an industrially prefabricated system of complete volumes. Different sound insulation was found between floor numbers as the apartments on the highest floor achieved significantly better sound insulation. This difference was assumed to be due to the extra weight on lower floors affecting the elastic connections used to structurally connect the apartments. The variation between apartments on the same floor was therefore evaluated using the Root Mean Square Error, resulting in a standard deviation of 0,9 dB and 1,4 dB for the airborne and impact sound insulation, respectively. The measurement variance was subtracted from the total variance. The remaining, unexplainable, variation of 0,8 dB in airborne sound insulation can be attributed to workmanship.

Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4477 (URN)10.1260/1351-010X.17.2.91 (DOI)26965a00-ba4d-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Local ID)26965a00-ba4d-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (Archive number)26965a00-ba4d-11df-a707-000ea68e967b (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2010; 20100907 (ricokv)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-04-03Bibliographically approved
2. On the uncertainty of building acoustic measurements: Case study of a cross-laminated timber construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the uncertainty of building acoustic measurements: Case study of a cross-laminated timber construction
2012 (English)In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, E-ISSN 1872-910X, Vol. 73, no 9, 904-912 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

If variations and uncertainty in building acoustic measurements can be controlled, construction costs can potentially be reduced since the building will not have to be acoustically over-designed. Field measurements of impact and airborne sound insulation were carried out for an industrially prefabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT) system of plate elements. The results from 18 rooms, forming three groups with respect to size, were compared to a similar study dealing with a prefabricated Volume Based Building (VBB) system. Large variations were found at frequencies below 100 Hz which is crucial for the low frequency adaptation terms connected to the weighted sound insulation indices. The measurement uncertainty was investigated by analysing the repeatability, measurement direction and the time dependence of the sound source. The variations due to the measurement procedure were found to be small compared to the total variations. It was also indicated that the variations in sound insulation are smaller with a prefabricated system compared to on-site production, since less work is required at the building site

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14769 (URN)10.1016/j.apacoust.2012.03.012 (DOI)e30fdd61-692b-4f18-9db8-9dcaba2ca212 (Local ID)e30fdd61-692b-4f18-9db8-9dcaba2ca212 (Archive number)e30fdd61-692b-4f18-9db8-9dcaba2ca212 (OAI)
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120418 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-04-03Bibliographically approved
3. Uncertainty of in situ low frequency reverberation time measurements from 20 Hz: An empirical study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncertainty of in situ low frequency reverberation time measurements from 20 Hz: An empirical study
2016 (English)In: Noise Control Engineering Journal, ISSN 0736-2501, E-ISSN 2168-8710, Vol. 64, no 6, 706-715 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measuring reverberation time is normally one of the steps within the procedure of determining sound insulation in dwellings where 100 or 50 Hz usually serves as the lower frequency limit. However, even lower frequencies have become a matter of interest as research in the field recently indicated that the range 20-50 Hz seems to be of great importance when it comes to the perception of impact sound in lightweight buildings. A major issue in this context is then whether it is appropriate to measure and evaluate reverberation time at such low frequencies. This paper presents an empirical study of reverberation time measurements made in two rooms using more than 100 microphone positions in each. The measurement uncertainty with respect to microphone position and combinations of positions are compared for the frequency bands from 16 to 1600 Hz. Furthermore, it is analyzed how many microphone positions are needed in order to, with a reasonable probability, end up with an uncertainty in the related standardized impact sound level insulation L′n,T within ±1 dB

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62674 (URN)10.3397/1/376413 (DOI)2-s2.0-85014777501 (ScopusID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-24 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-24 Created: 2017-03-24 Last updated: 2017-04-03Bibliographically approved
4. Correlation between sound insulation and occupants’ perception: Proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound, part II
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlation between sound insulation and occupants’ perception: Proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound, part II
2017 (English)In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682x, Vol. 123, 143-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A previous Swedish research project indicated the potential need for evaluating impact sound insulation from 20 Hz in buildings with lightweight constructions. This is a discrepancy compared to the commonly used frequency intervals starting from 50 or 100 Hz. The statistical significance of this groundbreaking suggestion was however not satisfactorily strong since the result was based upon a limited number of building objects.

The scope of the present paper is to secure the previous study by adding additional objects to the underlying database, thereby increasing the confidence of the results. The methodology is to perform impact sound insulation measurements in apartment buildings of various construction types and to perform questionnaire surveys among the residents. The measured sound insulation is compared to the subjective rating by the occupants in order to find the parameter giving the highest correlation with respect to frequency range and weighting.

The highest correlation was found when the impact sound insulation was evaluated from 25 Hz using a flat frequency-weighting factor. Frequencies below 50 Hz are of great importance when evaluating impact sound insulation in lightweight constructions

National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62615 (URN)10.1016/j.apacoust.2017.03.014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85015798378 (ScopusID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-22 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-22 Created: 2017-03-22 Last updated: 2017-04-04Bibliographically approved

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