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Securing benefits for local communities from international visitors to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park
University of Johannesburg, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8076-4443
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. University of Cape Town, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3400-7548
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7206-6568
2017 (English)In: Tourism Economics, ISSN 1354-8166, E-ISSN 2044-0375, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1553-1567Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article estimates the visitation demand function for Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park (KTP) in order to determine the scope for raising fees charged to international tourists in order to fund revenue-sharing schemes for local communities. International and Southern African Development Community tourists account for approximately 25% and 2% of the total number of visitors to South African national parks, with domestic visitors making up the remaining portion. Although small, the South African international tourism market is mature and accounts for a disproportionately large share (around 42%) of net revenue. To estimate visitation demand at the KTP and three other national parks, random effects Tobit Model was used. Using the estimated elasticities, the revenue-maximizing daily conservation fee was computed to be R1 131.94 (US$144.20) for KTP, which can be compared with the R180 (US$22.93) currently charged. Furthermore, the study also demonstrated that there is a possibility of raising fees at the other three parks. Sharing conservation revenue with communities surrounding parks could demonstrate the link between ecotourism and local communities’ economic development and promote a positive view of land restitution involving national parks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1553-1567
Keywords [en]
benefit-sharing, conservation fee, demand, international visitors, land claim, national park
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62983DOI: 10.1177/1354816617707593ISI: 000415841700002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85034582613OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62983DiVA, id: diva2:1087997
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-11-27 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Muchapondwa, EdwinStage, Jesper

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