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Progress in Bioactive Metal and, Ceramic Implants for Load-Bearing Application
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1304-3686
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield.
Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield.
Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield.
2016 (English)In: Advanced Techniques in Bone Regeneration / [ed] Alessandro Rozim Zorzi and Joao Batista de Miranda, Croatia: INTECH, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The field of biomaterials is an exuberant and enticing field, attracting interest across a number of scientific disciplines. Synthetic materials such as metals and ceramics have helped civilisation accomplish many feats, and this can also be said for the achievements in orthopaedic applications. Metals and ceramics have achieved success in non-load-bearing applications and attempts are made to translate the accomplishments into weight-bearing applications. For this, a material needs to be porous but with sufficient strength to withstand daily loading; however, both properties are mutually exclusive. The implant must also avoid causing adverse reactions and toxicity and, preferably, bond to the surrounding tissues. Metals such as stainless steels and chromium-cobalt alloys have been used due to their excellent mechanical properties that can withstand daily activities, but retrospective studies have alluded to the possibilities of significant adverse reaction when implanted within the human body, caused by the elution of metal ions. Lessons from metals have also demonstrated that materials with significantly higher mechanical properties will not necessarily enhance the longevity of the implant—such is the complexity of the human body. Ceramics, on the other hand, exhibit excellent biocompatibility, but their mechanical properties are a significant hindrance for load-bearing use. Thus, the chapter herein provides a select overview of contemporary research undertaken to address the aforementioned drawbacks for both metals and ceramics. Furthermore, the chapter includes a section of how metals and ceramics can be combined in a multi-material approach to bring together their respective properties to achieve a desirable characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Croatia: INTECH, 2016.
National Category
Engineering and Technology Materials Engineering Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63174DOI: 10.5772/62598ISBN: 978-953-51-2539-6 (print)ISBN: 978-953-51-2538-9 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-63174DiVA: diva2:1091636
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-05-02Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.intechopen.com/books/advanced-techniques-in-bone-regeneration/progress-in-bioactive-metal-and-ceramic-implants-for-load-bearing-application

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