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The effect of ageing on elastohydrodynamic friction in heavy-duty diesel engine oils
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8533-897X
Dynamics, Acoustics and Tribology, Engine Dynamics, Scania, Scania Technical Centre.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9110-2819
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part J, journal of engineering tribology, ISSN 1350-6501, E-ISSN 2041-305X, Vol. 231, no 6, 708-715 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To further improve the efficiency of machine components found in automotive engine systems it is important to understand the friction generation in these components. Modelling and simulation of these components are crucial parts of the development process. Accurate simulation of the friction generated in these machine components is, amongst other things, dependent on realistic lubricant rheology and lubricant properties, where especially the latter may change during ageing of the lubricant. Many modern heavy-duty diesel engines are in operation for several hundred hours before the engine oil is changed. In this work, two engine oils, one 10 W-30 and one 5 W-20, have been aged in full heavy-duty diesel engine bench tests for 400 and 470 hours respectively. This roughly corresponds to the amount of ageing these oils are subjected to between oil drains in field conditions. The aged oils were subjected to a number of oil analyses showing, among other things, a maximum increase in oil viscosity of 12.9% for the 5 W-20 oil and 5.5% for the 10 W-30 oil, which is most likely primarily an effect of evaporation and oxidation. The aged oils were tested in a ball-on-disc test rig under elastohydrodynamic conditions where friction was measured and the performance was compared to fresh samples of the same oils. The results show that there is almost no difference in elastohydrodynamic friction when comparing the aged oils with the fresh oils. These results indicate that it is not necessary to include oil ageing in numerical elastohydrodynamic friction models as long as the oil is changed before the ageing has reached a critical level

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017. Vol. 231, no 6, 708-715 p.
National Category
Tribology
Research subject
Machine Elements
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63610DOI: 10.1177/1350650116674848ISI: 000402067300004ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85019744905OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-63610DiVA: diva2:1103495
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-05-30 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-06-15Bibliographically approved

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