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Major transport corridors: the concept of sustainability in EU documents
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8624-8271
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8870-2626
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6075-9885
Number of Authors: 3
2016 (English)In: Transportation Research Procedia, ISSN 2324-9935, E-ISSN 2352-1465, Vol. 25, 3698-3706 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper results are presented from document- and literature studies examining how the concepts of sustainability and sustainable development (economical, ecological and social) are used in the process of developing main transport corridors in the European Union.  Particular focus has been placed on the Scandinavian-Mediterranean (ScanMed) transport corridor, a strategic part of the trans-European network for transports (TEN-T). European Union transport policy documents were studied along with the legislation for TEN-T and documents regarding implementation of the ScanMed corridor.

The paper highlights that the concept of sustainable development is used in a multifaceted way, sometimes indicating the overarching goal of sustainability, sometimes indicating certain dimensions, and sometimes referring to conducting efforts in a sustainable way. This implies that stakeholders are led to perceive the concept in various ways, influencing how measures are implemented and how the economic, ecological and social dimensions of sustainability are integrated. Reinforcing a holistic perspective of sustainability and sustainable development as integrating economic, ecological and social benefits for a desired development would avoid the perception of sustainability as merely addressing a specific dimension, like environmental concerns. In part this could be strengthened by clearly framing the particular dimensions of sustainability being addressed in different parts of major transport corridor documents, for example; “economic sustainability” or “social sustainability”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 25, 3698-3706 p.
National Category
Architectural Engineering Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-63982DOI: 10.1016/j.trpro.2017.05.339ISI: 000404963803055Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020309934OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-63982DiVA: diva2:1109359
Conference
World Conference on Transport Research - WCTR 2016 Shanghai. 10-15 July 2016
Note

Konferensartikel i tidskrift

Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Governance for sustainable development of major European transport corridors: The Scandinavian-Mediterranean TEN-T core network corridor
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governance for sustainable development of major European transport corridors: The Scandinavian-Mediterranean TEN-T core network corridor
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Intermodal road, rail, air and sea transport networks across the European Union (EU) calledTrans-European Networks for Transport (TEN-T) are currently being implemented. Keyelements, which should be implemented by 2030, are the most strategic TEN-T Core networkcorridors. These nine corridors are expected to enhance smoothness and sustainability oftransport across the EU, thereby enhancing cohesion between EU nations, and relate to non-EU nations. In the EU Regulation 1315/2013 a governance framework for implementation ofthe Core network corridors is outlined, which mainly involves appointment of a Europeancoordinator for each corridor, establishment of Corridor forums for consultations, andformulation of work plans and follow-up measures.This framework is now being implemented in practice. A recognised challenge in the processis engaging the numerous, diverse stakeholders. A possible solution is to introduceappropriate elements of complementary governance. Thus, in this doctoral research, suitablecomplementary governance to support the sustainable development of a Core networkcorridor was investigated. Complementary governance, a concept that was developed andrefined during the project, refers here to additional governance in relation to the governanceframework described for the EU Core network corridors in the EU Regulation 1315/2013.To address an identified gap in knowledge on the nature and utility of complementarygovernance a series of studies was carried out. The studies included a study of relevantacademic literature, studies of EU transport policy and implementation documents regardinggovernance and sustainability, a survey of views of Scandinavian-Mediterranean Corridorforum participants, and interviews with stakeholders in the Baltic Sea region. These studiescollectively constitute a case study, focusing on the Scandinavian-Mediterranean Corenetwork corridor, of the need for, and if a need is present the optimal design of,complementary governance in the process of sustainable development of a Core networkcorridor.The main findings of the studies are that the implementation process of the Core networkcorridors could benefit from complementary governance measures, mainly to increaseinclusiveness, which is crucial for a sustainable development. Complementary governancecould both deepen and broaden stakeholder awareness and involvement. This may haveseveral advantages, such as increasing possibilities for stakeholders to influence the processand benefit from the corridor, align activities, and promote cooperation and learning betweenstakeholders. Moreover, including stakeholders who are based outside the corridors mayimprove distributive aspects of the investments and reduce risks of focusing attention tooclosely on the corridors per se. However, broadening stakeholder inclusion also hasdisadvantages, as it increases the complexity of the process, which may impair itseffectiveness, and may lead to unrepresentative involvement due to differences instakeholders’ interests, administrative capacities and power. It also increases requirements forcoordination.The nature of complementary governance is multifaceted and related to diverse dimensions ofgovernance, such as processes, stakeholder participation and implementation documents. For complementary governance measures a flexible and task-specific multi-level design isemphasised, which may involve various types of engagement mechanisms. Further, thefindings showed a need to extend previously recognised types of public engagementmechanisms based on communication, consultation and participation in the decision-makingstage, by recognising another category, named stakeholder exchange. This category ischaracterised by stakeholder cooperation and collaboration in an implementation stage wheremain goals and policies already are in place.Areas for complementary governance in the implementation process of the Core networkcorridors were indicated in the interview study. They consisted of extended involvement ofprivate stakeholders, extended involvement of regional and local stakeholders, extendedinvolvement of stakeholders geographically external to the immediate corridor, and extendedinformation both generally and specifically (i.e. directed information to specific stakeholders).Several complementary governance measures that could potentially improve implementationof the Core network corridors were raised in the interviews, ranging from minor adjustment inthe existing process to entirely new solutions. These ideas correspond well to the indicatedareas and provide robust foundations for further discussion.Thus, findings from the research suggest several governance measures to systematicallyinvolve and engage diverse stakeholders in the Core network corridor implementationprocess. However, before introducing such measures, they should be assessed together withexisting governance measures, to avoid overlapping or contradictory initiatives, possiblyusing policy packaging approaches, where policies are combined and analysed together toachieve a desired overall outcome. Proposals for future research and practices are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå University of Technology, 2017
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65579 (URN)978-91-7583-961-5 (ISBN)978-91-7583-962-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-11-10, E632, 09:00 (English)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Öberg, MariaNilsson, Kristina L.Johansson, Charlotta

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