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Depressive symptoms among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury: Associations with secondary health conditions, sense of coherence, coping strategies and physical activity
Department of Health Sciences, PO Box 157, Lund University.
School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC.
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5294-3332
2017 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 644-651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the presence of depressive symptoms among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury and investigate the association with sociodemographic and injury characteristics; and to determine how potentially modifiable factors, i.e. secondary health conditions, sense of coherence, coping strategies and leisure-time physical activity, are associated with depressive symptoms.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 122 individuals (70% men, injury levels C1-L5, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-D), mean age 63 years, mean time since injury 24 years.

METHODS:

Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study, collected using the Geriatric Depression Scale-15, the 13-item Sense of Coherence Scale, the Spinal Cord Lesion-related Coping Strategies Questionnaire and the Physical Activity Recall Assessment for people with Spinal Cord Injury. Associations were analysed using multivariable linear regression.

RESULTS:

A total of 29% reported clinically relevant depressive symptoms and 5% reported probable depression. Sense of coherence, the coping strategy Acceptance, neuropathic pain and leisure-time physical activity explained 53% of the variance in depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSION:

Older adults with long-term spinal cord injury report a low presence of probable depression. Mental health may be supported through rehabilitation that strengthens the ability to understand and confront life stressors, promotes acceptance of the injury, provides pain management and encourages participation in leisure-time physical activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Foundation for Rehabilitation Information , 2017. Vol. 49, no 8, p. 644-651
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65475DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2259ISI: 000410760700005PubMedID: 28762446Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85028709786OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-65475DiVA, id: diva2:1138220
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-09-04 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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