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Relating nanoscale accessibility within plant cell walls to improved enzyme hydrolysis yields in corn stover subjected to diverse pretreatments
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University; DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, and Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9313-941X
2017 (English)In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 65, no 39, 8652-8662 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simultaneous chemical modification and physical reorganization of plant cell walls via alkaline hydrogen peroxide or liquid hot water pretreatment can alter cell wall structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity. Nanoscale porosity was characterized using solute exclusion to assess accessible pore volumes, water retention value as a proxy for accessible water-cell walls surface area, and solute-induced cell wall swelling to measure cell wall rigidity. Key findings concluded that delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity and that the subsequent cell wall swelling resulted increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzyme binding and hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 Å dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2017. Vol. 65, no 39, 8652-8662 p.
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65572DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03240ISI: 000412717300015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85032728068OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-65572DiVA: diva2:1140133
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-10-16 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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