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Dysphoric symptoms in relation to other behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, among elderly in nursing homes
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå university.
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Umeå University.
Department of Nursing, Umeå University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
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2017 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, no 1, 206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common and varied in the elderly. The aim of the current study was to explore associations between BPSD and dysphoric symptoms at different levels of cognitive impairment.

METHODS:

Assessments of 4397 elderly individuals living in nursing homes in Sweden were performed. Data on cognitive function and BPSD were collected using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). The relationships between dysphoria and eight BPSD factors were plotted against cognitive function to investigate how dysphoria affects BPSD throughout the dementia disease.

RESULTS:

Overall, dysphoric symptoms were most prevalent in persons with moderate cognitive impairment. However, moderate to severe dysphoric symptoms showed no clear variation with cognitive impairment. Furthermore, aggressive behavior, verbally disruptive/attention-seeking behavior, hallucinatory symptoms and wandering behavior were more common with concurrent dysphoria regardless of cognitive function. In contrast, passiveness was more common with concurrent dysphoria in mild cognitive impairment but not in moderate to severe cognitive impairment.

CONCLUSIONS:

BPSD, including aggressive behavior and hallucinations, were more common with concurrent dysphoric symptoms, providing insight into behavioral and psychological symptoms among individuals with cognitive impairment. Apathy was more commonly associated with concurrent dysphoria at early stages of cognitive decline but not at later stages, indicating that apathy and dysphoria represent separate syndromes among elderly patients with moderate to severe cognitive impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017. Vol. 17, no 1, 206
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65576DOI: 10.1186/s12877-017-0603-4ISI: 000409527200002PubMedID: 28882104Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85028984425OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-65576DiVA: diva2:1140148
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-09-11 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2017-09-25Bibliographically approved

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