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CYCLAM: Recycling by a Laser-driven Drop Jet from Waste that Feeds AM
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3569-6795
University of Mosul, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
2017 (English)In: Physics Procedia, ISSN 1875-3892, E-ISSN 1875-3892, Vol. 89, 187-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing of metal parts is supplied by powder or wire. Manufacturing of this raw material causes additional costs and environmental impact. A new technique is proposed where the feeding directly originates from a metal sheet, which can even be waste. When cutting is done by laser-induced boiling, melt is continuously ejected downwards underneath the sheet. The ejected melt is deposited as a track on a substrate, enabling additive manufacturing by substrate movement along a desired path. The melt first flows downwards as a column and after a few millimeters separates into drops, here about 500 micrometer in diameter, as observed by high speed imaging. The drops incorporate sequentially and calmly into a long melt pool on the substrate. While steel drops formed regular tracks on steel and aluminium substrates, on copper substrate periodic drops solidified instead. For this new technique, called CYCLAM, the laser beam acts indirectly while the drop jet becomes the main tool. From imaging, properties like the width or fluctuations of the drop jet can be statistically evaluated. Despite oscillation of the liquid column, the divergence of the drop jet remained small, improving the precision and robustness. The melt leaves the cut sheet as a liquid column, 1 to 4 mm in length, which periodically separates drops that are transferred as a liquid jet to the substrate. For very short distance of 2 to 3 mm between the two sheets this liquid column can transfer the melt continuously as a liquid bridge. This phenomenon was observed, as a variant of the technique, but the duration of the bridge was limited by fluid mechanic instabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 89, 187-196 p.
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-65861DOI: 10.1016/j.phpro.2017.08.015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-65861DiVA: diva2:1144940
Conference
16th Nordic Laser Materials Processing Conference, NOLAMP16, Aalborg, Denmark, 22-24 August 2017
Note

Konferensartikel i tidskrift

Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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