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Need for reassurance in self-care of minor illnesses
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7830-8791
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

This study describes people's need for reassurance in self-care of minor illnesses.

BACKGROUND:

Self-care and active surveillance are advocated as important strategies to manage minor illnesses. Reassurance influences patient satisfaction and confidence in the practicing of self-care.

DESIGN:

This study is a descriptive and interpretive qualitative study.

METHODS:

Twelve persons with experience in self-care and receiving self-care advice were recruited, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews between September and December 2014. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analyses.

RESULTS:

Having previous experience and the ability to actively manage symptoms using self-care interventions was described as reassuring. Participants became stressed and concerned when the symptoms persisted and interventions lacked the desired effect, which often resulted in a decision to consult. Participants wanted to feel that the nurse was an actual person, who was sympathetic, present and understanding, when they received self-care advice. The nurse's assessment and reasoning of the symptoms facilitated care-seekers' assessments of risk, and clear and concrete advice on how to manage the symptoms exerted a calming effect. Patients needed to trust that the nurse understood their situation to embrace the advice, and being invited to return created a feeling that the nurse had listened and taken them seriously.

CONCLUSION:

Reassurance has the potential to allay doubts and fears to build confidence, which influences self-care and consultation behavior. Personal presence in the encounter, receiving an assessment and an explanation of the symptoms and precise advice are reassuring. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Nursing Probability Theory and Statistics
Research subject
Nursing; Matemathical Statistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66572DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14157PubMedID: 29119676OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-66572DiVA: diva2:1156542
Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-24

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