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Care and Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury in Neolithic Sweden: A case study of ante-mortem skull trauma and brain injury addressed through the bioarchaeology of care
Deptartment of Archaeology and Ancient History, Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3323-8512
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Medical Rehabilitation Section, Department of General Medicine, Sunderby Hospital/Kalix Hospital, Luleå; Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1127-1178
2018 (English)In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 188-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A number of papers have provided insight in frequencies of violence related trauma, especially skull trauma, in northern European skeletal assemblages dating to the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Although the cases are often well described, they lack further discussion about the consequences of skull trauma for the injured individual and the implications for the surrounding society, especially considering severe skull trauma leading to traumatic brain injuries (TBI). In this paper we address questions of trauma and care for one individual associated with the Swedish-Norwegian Battle Axe Culture who suffered from two severe ante-mortem skull traumas probably leading to brain injuries. These questions are addressed using the web-based application and analytic tool Index of care. We found that daily care, both short term with basic needs like nutrition and grooming, and long term with cognitive impairments, was available in the Neolithic society. Considering the frequent number of ante-mortem skull trauma in Neolithic and Bronze Age skeletal assemblages TBI was probably a common phenomenon. We argue that the care provided was a necessity for survival and maintenance of a socially sustainable society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. Vol. 28, no 2, p. 188-198
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67741DOI: 10.1002/oa.2646ISI: 000430121200011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-67741DiVA, id: diva2:1185221
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-04-30 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oa.2646/full

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