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Seismic characteristics and distribution of volcanic intrusions and hydrothermal vent complexes in the Vøring and Møre basins
Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), Oslo Research Park.
Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), Oslo Research Park.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1629-2920
Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), Oslo Research Park.
TGS-NOPEC.
2005 (English)In: Petroleum Geology Conference Proceedings, ISSN 2047-9921, Vol. 6, p. 833-844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A voluminous magmatic complex was emplaced in the Vøring and Møre basins during Paleocene/ Eocene continental rifting and break-up in the NE Atlantic. This intrusive event has had a significant impact on deformation, source-rock maturation and fluid flow in the basins. Intrusive complexes and associated hydrothermal vent complexes have been mapped on a regional 2D seismic dataset (c.150 000 km) and on one large 3D survey. The extent of the sill complex is at least 80 000 km2, with an estimated total volume of 0.9 to 2.8 × 104 km3. The sheet intrusions are saucer-shaped in undeformed basin segments. The widths of the saucers become larger with increasing emplacement depth. More varied intrusion geometries are found in structured basin segments. Some 734 hydrothermal vent complexes have been identified, although it is estimated that 2-3000 vent complexes are present in the basins. The vent complexes are located above sills and were formed as a direct consequence of the intrusive event by explosive eruption of gases, liquids and sediments, forming up to 11 km wide craters at the seafloor. The largest vent complexes are found in basin segments with deep sills (3-9km palaeodepth). Mounds and seismic seep anomalies located above the hydrothermal vent complexes suggest that the vent complexes have been re-used for vertical fluid migration long after their formation. The intrusive event mainly took place just prior to, or during, the initial phase of massive break-up volcanism (55.0-55.8Ma). There is also evidence for a minor Upper Paleocene volcanic event documented by the presence of 20 vent complexes terminating in the Upper Paleocene sequence and the local presence of extrusive volcanic rocks within the Paleocene sequence

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Petroleum Geology Conferences , 2005. Vol. 6, p. 833-844
National Category
Geophysics
Research subject
Exploration Geophysics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-67902DOI: 10.1144/0060833Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80052546086OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-67902DiVA, id: diva2:1189346
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved

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