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Preparation of a novel lipid-core micelle using a low-energy emulsification method
Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0654-5410
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science. Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3190-2168
2018 (English)In: Drug Delivery and Translational Research, ISSN 2190-393XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

High-energy methods for the manufacturing of nanomedicines are widely used; however, interest in low-energy methods is increasing due to their simplicity, better control over the process, and energy-saving characteristics during upscaling. Here, we developed a novel lipid-core micelle (LCM) as a nanocarrier to encapsulate a poorly water-soluble drug, nifedipine (NFD), by hot-melt emulsification, a low-energy method. LCMs are self-assembling colloidal particles composed of a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic shell. Hybrid materials, such as Gelucire 44/14, are thus excellent candidates for their preparation. We characterized the obtained nanocarriers for their colloidal properties, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, liquid state, stability, and drug release. The low-energy method hot-melt emulsification was successfully adapted for the manufacturing of small and narrowly dispersed LCMs. The obtained LCMs had a small average size of ~ 11 nm and a narrow polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.228. These nanocarriers were able to increase the amount of NFD dispersible in water more than 700-fold. Due to their sustained drug release profile and the PEGylation of Gelucire 44/14, these nanocarriers represent an excellent starting point for the development of drug delivery systems designed for long circulation times and passive targeting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018.
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68401DOI: 10.1007/s13346-018-0521-9PubMedID: 29663150OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-68401DiVA, id: diva2:1198617
Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-04-25

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