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Smart Factory Implementation and Process Innovation: A Preliminary Maturity Model for Leveraging Digitalization in Manufacturing : Moving to smart factories presents specific challenges that can be addressed through a structured approach focused on people, processes, and technologies.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5464-2007
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3255-414X
Accenture.
Deloitte.
2018 (English)In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thedevelopment of novel digital technologies connected to the Internet of Things, alongwith advancements in artificial intelligence and automation, is enabling a newwave of manufacturing innovation. “Smart factories” will leverage industrialequipment that communicates with users and with other machines, automatedprocesses, and mechanisms to facilitate real-time communication between thefactory and the market to support dynamic adaptation and maximize efficiency. Smartfactories can yield a range of benefits, such as increased process efficiency,product quality, sustainability, and safety and decreased costs. However, companiesface immense challenges implementing smart factories, given the large-scalesystemic transformation the move requires. We use data gathered from in-depth studiesof five factories in two leading automotive manufacturers to analyze these challengesand identify the key steps needed to implement the smart factory concept. Basedon our analysis, we offer a preliminary maturity model for smart factory implementationbuilt around three overarching principles: cultivating digital people, introducingagile processes, and configuring modular technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 61, no 5, p. 22-31
Keywords [en]
Smart factory; Process innovation; Industry 4.0; Digitalization; Maturity model
National Category
Business Administration Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-68548DOI: 10.1080/08956308.2018.1471277Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053247101OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-68548DiVA, id: diva2:1202716
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-09-21 (svasva)

Available from: 2018-04-30 Created: 2018-04-30 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved

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