Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Managing urban flood resilience as a multilevel governance challenge: an analysis of required multilevel coordination mechanisms
Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Environmental Governance.
Antwerp University, Research Group Environment and Society.
Flood Hazard Research Centre, Middlesex University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7199-7843
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In both academic literature and flood risk management practices, it is argued that governance initiatives are needed to enhance the flood resilience of urban agglomerations. Multiple levels of governance will be involved in this activity. However, thus far, the literature has hardly addressed what mechanisms are required to coordinate the different levels of managing urban flood resilience, and what factors account for these mechanisms. Our aim is to address this knowledge gap. Here, we examine six in-depth case studies undertaken in urban agglomerations in different European countries: Dordrecht, the Netherlands; Hull, UK; Geraardsbergen, Belgium; Karlstad, Sweden; Wroclaw, Poland; and Nice, France. The case studies reveal the ways in which multiple levels of governance are involved in managing urban flood resilience. Coordination among governance levels is achieved by proactive policy entrepreneurs, the use of bridging concepts, clear rules, and the provision of resources. These mechanisms seem to be universally applicable, but their characteristics appear to be highly dependent on more general institutional, economic, geographical, and cultural contextual factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Resilience Alliance , 2018. Vol. 23, no 1, article id 31
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69532DOI: 10.5751/ES-09962-230131ISI: 000432464800038OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-69532DiVA, id: diva2:1218543
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-14 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Ek, Kristina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ek, Kristina
By organisation
Social Sciences
In the same journal
Ecology & society
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf