Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Increasing fatigue performance in AHSS thick sheet by surface treatments
Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Metallic and Ceramic Materials Department, Manresa, Spain.
Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Metallic and Ceramic Materials Department, Manresa, Spain.
SCANIA AB, Materials Technology Department, Södertälje, Sweden.
Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Metallic and Ceramic Materials Department, Manresa, Spain.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: MATEC Web of Conferences: 12th International Fatigue Congress (FATIGUE 2018) / [ed] Henaff G., EDP Sciences, 2018, Vol. 165, article id 22015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) have been widely applied in the automotive industry as an affordable solution for car lightweighting, mainly in parts subjected to crash requirements. Heavy duty vehicle (HDV) can also benefit from the expertise learned in cars, but parts must be designed considering fatigue resistance, especially on trimmed areas, and stiffness. Mechanical surface treatments, as blasting or shot peening, help increasing fatigue life of AHSS in trimmed areas and will allow weight reduction in HDV through gauge downsizing. The expected decrease in stiffness through thickness reduction can be improved by design changes. However, scarce information about the effect of mechanical surface treatments on AHSS are available. Thus, the aim of this work is to evaluate the increment in fatigue life of two different steel grades (350 MPa, and 500MPa of yield strength) in thick sheet by means of mechanical surface treatment - sandblasting. High Cycle Fatigue [HCF] tests were conducted at alternating load [R=-1]. Residual stresses were measured by an X-ray tensometry prior fatigue tests. Also the surface roughness [Rz] and form is measured using an optical non-contact 3D microscope. On the other hand, the fracture surfaces of the test specimens were observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to determine the crack initiation points. The evaluation of fatigue life in terms of SN curves is also discussed, analysing how the sandblasting process modifies the surface roughness and introduce compressive residual stresses on the external layer of the material. Both phenomena enhance the fatigue strength of the evaluated steel grades. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EDP Sciences, 2018. Vol. 165, article id 22015
Series
MATEC Web of Conferences, E-ISSN 2261-236X ; 165
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Research subject
Solid Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69563DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201816522015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048093027OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-69563DiVA, id: diva2:1219036
Conference
12th International Fatigue Congress, FATIGUE 2018; Poitiers Futuroscope; France; 27 maj - 1 juni 2018
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Casellas, Daniel

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Casellas, Daniel
By organisation
Mechanics of Solid Materials
Applied Mechanics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf