Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evaluation of 3D-printed parts by means of high-performance computer tomography
Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology.
Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology.
Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Journal of laser applications, ISSN 1042-346X, E-ISSN 1938-1387, Vol. 30, no 3, article id 032307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conventional tactile and optical testing methods are not capable to detect complex inner geometries or complex surface shapes. Detecting porosities in parts is also not possible with those nondestructive methods. Among other material parameters, geometrical accuracy is essential to determine part's quality. Additive manufacturing processes also have to be optimized regarding geometry deviations caused by distortion or unfavorable orientation in the build chamber. For additive manufactured parts that incorporate previously mentioned features, high-performance computer tomography is the more suitable nondestructive testing method. Components of different materials such as plastics, ceramics, composites, or metals can be completely characterized. This nondestructive testing method was used for porosity analysis regarding the shape and local distribution of pores in an additive manufactured part to find correlations concerning the most suitable process conditions. The measured part data were also compared to original CAD files to determine zones of deviation and apply specific process strategies to avoid distortion. This paper discusses the results of integrating high-performance computer tomography (power: 500 W, max. part size: Ø 300 mm, 300 × 430 mm2) in a productionlike environment of additively manufactured parts for a wide range of technologies (i.e., electron beam melting and selective laser melting). I. INTRODUCTION

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2018. Vol. 30, no 3, article id 032307
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69849DOI: 10.2351/1.5040644Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048982727OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-69849DiVA, id: diva2:1223519
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-06-25 (andbra)

Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brueckner, Frank
By organisation
Product and Production Development
In the same journal
Journal of laser applications
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf