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The Effect of Inkjet Printing over Polymeric Films as Potential Buccal Biologics Delivery Systems
Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
Instituto de Salud Pública de Chile, Santiago.
Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2645-5719
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2018 (English)In: AAPS PharmSciTech, ISSN 1530-9932, E-ISSN 1530-9932Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The buccal mucosa appears as a promissory route for biologic drug administration, and pharmaceutical films are flexible dosage forms that can be used in the buccal mucosa as drug delivery systems for either a local or systemic effect. Recently, thin films have been used as printing substrates to manufacture these dosage forms by inkjet printing. As such, it is necessary to investigate the effects of printing biologics on films as substrates in terms of their physical and mucoadhesive properties. Here, we explored solvent casting as a conventional method with two biocompatible polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, and chitosan, and we used electrospinning process as an electrospun film fabrication of polycaprolactone fibers due to its potential to elicit mucoadhesion. Lysozyme was used as biologic drug model and was formulated as a solution for printing by thermal inkjet printing. Films were characterized before and after printing by mechanical and mucoadhesive properties, surface, and ultrastructure morphology through scanning electron microscopy and solid state properties by thermal analysis. Although minor differences were detected in micrographs and thermograms in all polymeric films tested, neither mechanical nor mucoadhesive properties were affected by these differences. Thus, biologic drug printing on films was successful without affecting their mechanical or mucoadhesive properties. These results open way to explore biologics loading on buccal films by inkjet printing, and future efforts will include further in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018.
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Other Health Sciences
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Health Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69877DOI: 10.1208/s12249-018-1105-1PubMedID: 29934803OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-69877DiVA, id: diva2:1223782
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-06

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Vuddanda, Parameswara RaoVelaga, SitaramMorales, Javier O.

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