Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hand grip strength is associated with fatigue among men with COPD: epidemiological data from northern Sweden
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine , Umea University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5948-6880
Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University , Uppsala.
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, The OLIN Unit, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine , Umeå University , Umeå.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3619-2297
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate if hand grip strength (HGS) is associated with: 1) fatigue, and specifically clinically relevant fatigue (CRF); 2) low physical activity; and 3) fatigue independent of physical activity level, among individuals with and without COPD. Data were collected from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (OLIN) COPD-study in 2014. HGS was measured with a hand-grip dynamometer, fatigue and physical activity were assessed by questionnaires; FACIT-Fatigue respectively IPAQ. Among individuals with COPD (n = 389), but not without COPD (n = 442), HGS was lower among those with CRF than those without CRF, significantly so among men (p = 0.001) and close to among women (p = 0.051). HGS was not associated with physical activity levels within any of the groups. HGS was associated with fatigue among men, but not women, with COPD independent of physical activity level, age, height, and smoking habits (Beta = 0.190, 95% CI 0.061-0.319, respectively Beta = 0.048, 95% CI-0.056-0.152), while there were no corresponding significant findings among individuals without COPD. In summary, HGS was associated with CRF among individuals with COPD in this population-based study. Among men with COPD, HGS was associated with fatigue independent of physical activity level and common confounders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018.
National Category
Physiotherapy Nursing
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-69970DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1486490OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-69970DiVA, id: diva2:1228371
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2018-08-06

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Strandkvist, ViktorLarsson, AgnetaStridsman, Caroline

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Strandkvist, ViktorLarsson, AgnetaStridsman, Caroline
By organisation
Health and RehabilitationNursing Care
In the same journal
Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
PhysiotherapyNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf