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Life activity choices by people with aphasia: repeated interviews and proxy agreement
Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2241-3303
Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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2019 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 710-730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Person-centered rehabilitation requires that meaningful life activities are identified on a case-by-case basis, but the discovery process can be inaccessible for clients with aphasia. Card-sorting methodology addresses core barriers and help clients communicate their preferences.

Aims: To characterize life activities that people with aphasia want to do, to estimate consistency in selections over time, and to replicate previous findings about the ability of family members and friends to identify their loved ones’ activity preferences.

Methods & Procedures:  We administered the Life Interests and Values (LIV) Cards to 26 people with aphasia, asking them which of 95 depicted life activities they wanted to do more in their lives. Half the activity cards were presented again one to ten weeks later. Twenty family members or friends responded as proxies by selecting from a questionnaire with the same items.

Outcomes & Results: Participants with aphasia selected diverse activities, though as a group they identified significantly more activities from the “social” activity category than from the “home and community”, “creative and relaxing”, or “physical” categories. Across the repeated interviews, they selected identical activities on average 78% of the time. Item-to-item agreement between people with aphasia and their proxy responders was significantly lower at 69%.

Conclusions: People with aphasia have diverse activity interests and are reliable informants about their preferences. Because significant others have limited ability to predict these choices, their impressions are inadequate substitutes for direct interviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 33, no 6, p. 710-730
National Category
Occupational Therapy
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Occupational therapy
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-70535DOI: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1506087ISI: 000466534500005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85051939733OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-70535DiVA, id: diva2:1240672
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-04-12 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved

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Womack, Jennifer L.

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