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Orthographic Learning in Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7360-4858
National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, NSW, Australia; The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia; ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
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2018 (English)In: Language, speech & hearing services in schools, ISSN 0161-1461, E-ISSN 1558-9129, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between orthographic learning and language, reading, and cognitive skills in 9-year-old children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and to compare their performance to age-matched typically hearing (TH) controls.

Method Eighteen children diagnosed with moderate-to-profound hearing loss who use hearing aids and/or cochlear implants participated. Their performance was compared with 35 age-matched controls with typical hearing. Orthographic learning was evaluated using a spelling task and a recognition task. The children were assessed on measures of reading ability, language, working memory, and paired-associate learning.

Results On average, the DHH group performed more poorly than the TH controls on the spelling measure of orthographic learning, but not on the recognition measure. For both groups of children, there were significant correlations between orthographic learning and phonological decoding and between visual–verbal paired-associate learning and orthographic learning.

Conclusions Although the children who are DHH had lower scores in the spelling test of orthographic learning than their TH peers, measures of their reading ability revealed that they acquired orthographic representations successfully. The results are consistent with the self-teaching hypothesis in suggesting that phonological decoding is important for orthographic learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) , 2018. Vol. 50, no 1, p. 99-112
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71435DOI: 10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0146ISI: 000465297800007PubMedID: 30383206OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-71435DiVA, id: diva2:1260817
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-03-15 (oliekm)

Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved

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