Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Ecological and functional consequences of coastal ocean acidification: Perspectives from the Baltic-Skagerrak System
Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Geology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden;Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 831-854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ocean temperatures are rising; species are shifting poleward, and pH is falling (ocean acidification, OA). We summarise current understanding of OA in the brackish Baltic-Skagerrak System, focussing on the direct, indirect and interactive effects of OA with other anthropogenic drivers on marine biogeochemistry, organisms and ecosystems. Substantial recent advances reveal a pattern of stronger responses (positive or negative) of species than ecosystems, more positive responses at lower trophic levels and strong indirect interactions in food-webs. Common emergent themes were as follows: OA drives planktonic systems toward the microbial loop, reducing energy transfer to zooplankton and fish; and nutrient/food availability ameliorates negative impacts of OA. We identify several key areas for further research, notably the need for OA-relevant biogeochemical and ecosystem models, and understanding the ecological and evolutionary capacity of Baltic-Skagerrak ecosystems to respond to OA and other anthropogenic drivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 48, no 8, p. 831-854
Keywords [en]
Baltic Ecosystem services, Eutrophication Indirect effects, Ocean acidification, Warming
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-71859DOI: 10.1007/s13280-018-1110-3ISI: 000469438600003PubMedID: 30506502Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057595811OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-71859DiVA, id: diva2:1267453
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-11 (johcin)

Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Matti, Simon

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Matti, Simon
By organisation
Social Sciences
In the same journal
Ambio
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf