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Building surface materials as sources of micropollutants in building runoff: A pilot study
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3518-1273
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4732-7348
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9938-8217
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 680, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Control of diffuse pollution is critical for achieving good surface water quality status. In this context, pollutant contributions from building materials have received increased attention in recent decades. This study examined the releases of metals, nonylphenols and phthalates from ten common building surface materials (installed in triplicates) into rainwater runoff from six rain events. The highest releases of metals were from copper and zinc sheets (average concentrations of 3090 μg/L Cu and 7770 μg/L Zn respectively), while other metal materials, e.g., Corten weathering steel, exhibited lower releases. PVC roofing released high concentrations of nonylphenols and phthalates (average concentrations of up to 26 μg/L nonylphenols and 455 μg/L Diisononyl phthalate, DINP) which have not been investigated in the earlier studies. Pollutant releases varied between events, likely because of weather conditions and rainfall characteristics. Study findings should be valuable for environmentally responsible applications of the existing building materials and the development of new ones, as well as the investigations and risk assessment of specific pollutants in stormwater.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 680, p. 190-197
Keywords [en]
Building surface materials, Diffuse pollution sources, Metals, Nonylphenols, Phthalates, Stormwater quality
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73883DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.088ISI: 000468863400019PubMedID: 31108449Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85065712456OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-73883DiVA, id: diva2:1314585
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942 – 2016-73Vinnova, 2016-05176
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-06-05 (oliekm)

Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved

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Müller, AlexandraÖsterlund, HeleneNordqvist, KerstinMarsalek, JiriViklander, Maria

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