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Anthropogenic phosphorus flows under different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden
KTH, Industriell ekologi.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2829-2928
KTH, Industriell ekologi.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6430-8993
KTH, Industriell ekologi.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4530-3414
2016 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 542, p. 1094-1105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, concerns prevail about the unsustainable use of phosphorus and worldwide eutrophication, thus requiring efficient management of phosphorus flows. With increasing population and associated urban growth, urban management of phosphorus flows in the perspectives of recycling, eutrophication and total budget becomes increasingly important. This study mapped phosphorus flows for a reference year (2013) and a future year (2030) using different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden. The results indicated that the Swedish goal of recycling phosphorus from wastewater would cover the majority of the total phosphorus budget for Stockholm. However, in 2013, only 10% of phosphorus was recycled for agricultural use, around half of which was from sewage sludge and the other half from food waste. Almost 50% of total phosphorus was sent to landfill/mining waste capping with sewage sludge, for economic reasons and lack of market. Among the scenarios of upstream and downstream urban management options studied in combination with population growth, recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge had the greatest potential to increase the fraction recycled to agriculture. However, only upstream measures, e.g. changed diet, were able to reduce the total phosphorus budget. Urban management of phosphorus flows based on the different perspectives of recycling, eutrophication or total budget was shown to potentially result in different preferred management actions and both upstream and downstream measures need to be considered. Moreover, management needs to pay attention to small but environmentally sensitive flows, particularly when setting city goals on phosphorus recycling by percentage in a large budget.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2016. Vol. 542, p. 1094-1105
Keywords [en]
Phosphorus flow analysis, Scenarios, Phosphorus recycling, Total budget, Eutrophication
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-74317DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.09.024ISI: 000365602300010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84949320333OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-74317DiVA, id: diva2:1322287
Note

QC 20160105

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved

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Wu, JiechenMalmström, Maria E.

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