Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pragmatic Language Skills: A Comparison of Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Without Hearing Loss
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 2243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pragmatic language ability refers to the ability to use language in a social context. It has been found to be correlated with success in general education for deaf and hard of hearing children. It is therefore of great importance to study why deaf and hard of hearing children often perform more poorly than their hearing peers on tests measuring pragmatic language ability. In the current study the Pragmatics Profile questionnaire from the CELF-IV battery was used to measure pragmatic language ability in children using cochlear implants (N = 14) and children without a hearing loss (N = 34). No significant difference was found between the children with cochlear implants (CI) and the children without hearing loss (HL) for the sum score of the pragmatics language measure. However, 35.71% of the children with CI performed below age norm, while only 5.89% of the children without HL performed below age norm. In addition, when dividing the sum score into three sub-measures: Rituals and Conversational skills (RCS), Asking for, Giving, and Responding to Information (AGRI), and Nonverbal Communication skills (NCS), significant differences between the groups were found for the NCS measure and a tendency for a difference was found for the RCS measure. In addition, all three sub-measures (NCS, AGRI, RCS) were correlated to verbal fluency in the children with CI, but not the children without HL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019. Vol. 10, article id 2243
Keywords [en]
pragmatic language ability, hearing loss, cochlear implant, verbal fluency, childre
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76757DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02243ISI: 000496974600001PubMedID: 31649586Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85074147169OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-76757DiVA, id: diva2:1371238
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-11-19 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Wass, Malin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wass, Malin
By organisation
Humans and technology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf