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Hydraulic Binder Stabilised Near-Surface Soils Exposed to Cold Curing Climate and Freeze-Thaw Cycles
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
Ecoloop AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1935-1743
2019 (English)In: / [ed] ASCE, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Fine-grained soils are normally not suitable as subbase in road, railway, and other largescale constructions due to their compressibility, low shear strength, and/or frost susceptibility. Common procedures to improve the subbase are soil replacement, lightweight fill, or insulation. The engineering properties of fine-grained soils can also be improved in situ by mixing them with hydraulic binders. A SWOT analysis based on literature study indicates that near-surface soil stabilisation has opportunities as a method. However, one major weakness of the method of near-surface soil stabilisation is the question of strength reduction as a consequence of freeze-thaw cycles. It is unclear how near zero curing temperature followed by freeze-thaw cycles, representing conditions in northern countries, might influence the curing as well as the ultimate strength of the stabilised soil. The impact of freeze-thaw cycles on the engineering properties of stabilised soils was investigated with focus on the reduction of strength. In these laboratory investigations, curing took place at temperatures of +4°C with freeze-thaw cycles interrupting the curing period. Variations in the laboratory set up contained different soil types, binders, binder contents, and curing times before the freeze-thaw cycles. The results show, that the strength increases with curing time in spite of the near zero temperature; but for one binder, a strength-over-time development with decrease after 90 days has been observed in the cold curing conditions in the experiments. In general, the strength gained during curing was reduced by freeze-thaw cycles. However, strength was regained during curing afterwards, and reached a higher level of strength than the original soil before stabilisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Fine-grained soils, Soil stabilization, Frozen soils, Curing, Hydraulics, Soil properties, Soil strength, Binders (material)
National Category
Geotechnical Engineering
Research subject
Soil Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77437DOI: 10.1061/9780784482599.052OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-77437DiVA, id: diva2:1386035
Conference
18th International Conference on Cold Regions Engineering and 8th Canadian Permafrost Conference, August 18–22, 2019 | Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Transport AdministrationAvailable from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-16

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Rothhämel, MirjaLaue, Jan

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