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Friction and wear characteristics of steel on rock under water and oil based lubricated sliding conditions
Sintef Petroleum AS.
Sintef Petroleum AS.
Sintef Petroleum AS.
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
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2015 (English)In: Tribology - Materials, Surfaces & Interfaces, ISSN 1751-5831, E-ISSN 1751-584X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, drilling extended reach wells have become more and more common in the petroleum industry to optimise the oil and gas production. Extended reach wells are defined as wells that have two times more horizontal step out than true vertical depth. High friction (frictional torque) and drag are two of the mechanical limiting factors while drilling longer horizontal wellbores. There are numerous methods and tools developed to lower the drillstring friction. Drilling non-circular wellbores is a new concept with potential to minimise the mechanical friction by reducing drillstring and sidewalls contact area. However, this will cause an increase of contact pressure owing to the reduced contact area between drillstring and the formation. This article presents results obtained from an experimental study pertaining to the friction behaviour using a pin on disc set-up with steel pin and granite disc in the presence of water and oil based lubricants. These tests have been designed to represent frictional contact conditions between a rotating steel drillstring and the wellbore wall at different contact pressures. Test results show that the friction coefficient decreases with an increase of contact pressure in wet condition for both water and oil based lubricants. It is also observed that the friction factor increased by adding sand and phyllite particles to the water based lubricant. Considering the wear scars, the friction coefficient shows reduction with increased contact pressure in all tests with and without particles for both water and oil based lubricants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 9, no 2, p. 85-91
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Research subject
Machine Elements
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2420DOI: 10.1179/1751584X15Y.0000000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84932166089Local ID: 00b38b5b-6bd2-445b-9c81-2fc178e7d15bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-2420DiVA, id: diva2:975272
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 1; 20150812 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Lund, MartinPrakash, Braham

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