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Bioconversion of Biomass-Derived Phenols Catalyzed by Myceliophthora thermophila Laccase
Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0361-7690
Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
National Technical University of Athens, Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0079-5950
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2016 (English)In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 21, no 5, article id 550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomass-derived phenols have recently arisen as an attractive alternative for building blocks to be used in synthetic applications, due to their widespread availability as an abundant renewable resource. In the present paper, commercial laccase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila was used to bioconvert phenol monomers, namely catechol, pyrogallol and gallic acid in water. The resulting products from catechol and gallic acid were polymers that were partially characterized in respect to their optical and thermal properties, and their average molecular weight was estimated via solution viscosity measurements and GPC. FT-IR and 1H-NMR data suggest that phenol monomers are connected with ether or C–C bonds depending on the starting monomer, while the achieved molecular weight of polycatechol is found higher than the corresponding poly(gallic acid). On the other hand, under the same condition, pyrogallol was dimerized in a pure red crystalline compound and its structure was confirmed by 1H-NMR as purpurogallin. The herein studied green synthesis of enzymatically synthesized phenol polymers or biological active compounds could be exploited as an alternative synthetic route targeting a variety of applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 21, no 5, article id 550
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2500DOI: 10.3390/molecules21050550ISI: 000380241600015PubMedID: 27128897Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85015024951Local ID: 01e1fb1a-de6b-4d23-bd29-ff08bad896c0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-2500DiVA, id: diva2:975352
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160502 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Zerva, AnastasiaChristakopoulos, PaulTopakas, Evangelos

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