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Remediation of heavy metal(loid)s contaminated soils: To mobilize or to immobilize?
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia.
Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science.
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1442-1573
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 266, p. 141-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

nlike organic contaminants, metal(loid)s do not undergo microbial or chemical degradation and persist for a long time after their introduction. Bioavailability of metal(loid)s plays a vital role in the remediation of contaminated soils. In this review, the remediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils through manipulating their bioavailability using a range of soil amendments will be presented. Mobilizing amendments such as chelating and desorbing agents increase the bioavailability and mobility of metal(loid)s. Immobilizing amendments such of precipitating agents and sorbent materials decrease the bioavailabilty and mobility of metal(loid)s. Mobilizing agents can be used to enhance the removal of heavy metal(loid)s though plant uptake and soil washing. Immobilizing agents can be used to reduce the transfer to metal(loid)s to food chain via plant uptake and leaching to groundwater. One of the major limitations of mobilizing technique is susceptibility to leaching of the mobilized heavy metal(loid)s in the absence of active plant uptake. Similarly, in the case of the immobilization technique the long-term stability of the immobilized heavy metal(loid)s needs to be monitored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 266, p. 141-166
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2594DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.12.018ISI: 000331687100016PubMedID: 24394669Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84891604486Local ID: 03ae8e53-3c60-46a9-ab87-ba2df38bb1bbOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-2594DiVA, id: diva2:975447
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20131227 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Kumpiene, Jurate

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