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Effects of area ratio and nature of surfaces on scuffing in lubricated contacts
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1454-1118
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part J, journal of engineering tribology, ISSN 1350-6501, E-ISSN 2041-305X, Vol. 223, no 3, p. 445-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heavily loaded moving machine components encounter severe tribological problems. Typical examples include piston and cylinder contacts in a hydraulic motor. Piston and cylinder bore contacts invariably operate in boundary lubrication regime and the risk for seizure of these contacts is high particularly when lubricated with low-viscosity lubricants. The piston assembly in a radial piston hydraulic motor has conformal (area) contact. In this work, these contacts have been simulated in the laboratory by using a thrust washer test configuration. The influence of area ratio, nature of contacting surfaces, and speed on scuffing has been investigated by using a factorial design of experiments approach. The influence of area ratio on wear at lower speed has also been studied. The results have revealed that the surface power, or μpv-value, at scuffing varies by 3-4 times when the area ratio was increased from 8 to 72 per cent. The running-in wear tests have shown that running-in of the upper and lower specimens also varies with the area ratio. During the first 30 s the upper specimen is polished with low area ratio, whereas the lower specimen is polished with high area ratio. The surface temperature was estimated by using finite-element calculation and it was found to be similar prior to scuffing for both 8 and 72 per cent area ratios at 1.7 m/s sliding speed. The comparison of the results with the actual motor tests shows that an area ratio of 24 per cent seems to simulate the piston-cylinder contact better.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 223, no 3, p. 445-455
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Research subject
Machine Elements
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-2930DOI: 10.1243/13506501JET472ISI: 000266387900031Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-70349667237Local ID: 0ab4e980-0eed-11de-b3bc-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-2930DiVA, id: diva2:975784
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20090312 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Nilsson, DanielIsaksson, PatrikPrakash, Braham

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Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part J, journal of engineering tribology
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)

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