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Carbon speciation in ash, residual waste and contaminated soil by thermal and chemical analyses
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1442-1573
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2011 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon in waste can occur as inorganic (IC), organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) each having distinct chemical properties and possible environmental effects. In this study, carbon speciation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical degradation tests and the standard total organic carbon (TOC) measurement procedures in three types of waste materials (bottom ash, residual waste and contaminated soil). Over 50% of the total carbon (TC) in all studied materials (72% in ash and residual waste, and 59% in soil) was biologically non-reactive or EC as determined by thermogravimetric analyses. The speciation of TOC by chemical degradation also showed a presence of a non-degradable C fraction in all materials (60% of TOC in ash, 30% in residual waste and 13% in soil), though in smaller amounts than those determined by TGA. In principle, chemical degradation method can give an indication of the presence of potentially inert C in various waste materials, while TGA is a more precise technique for C speciation, given that waste-specific method adjustments are made. The standard TOC measurement yields exaggerated estimates of organic carbon and may therefore overestimate the potential environmental impacts (e.g. landfill gas generation) of waste materials in a landfill environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 31, no 1, p. 18-25
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3066DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2010.06.011ISI: 000284818100004PubMedID: 20630737Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78149357318Local ID: 0d4d9b80-9108-11df-8806-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3066DiVA, id: diva2:975922
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20100716 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Kumpiene, JurateRobinson, RyanBrännvall, EvelinaNordmark, DesireeAndreas, LaleLagerkvist, AndersEcke, Holger

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