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Simulation of metal cutting using the particle finite-element method and a physically based plasticity model
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3865-1426
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0910-7990
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
Number of Authors: 32017 (English)In: Computational Particle Mechanics, ISSN 2196-4378, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metal cutting is one of the most common metal-shaping processes. In this process, specified geometrical and surface properties are obtained through the break-up of material and removal by a cutting edge into a chip. The chip formation is associated with large strains, high strain rates and locally high temperatures due to adiabatic heating. These phenomena together with numerical complications make modeling of metal cutting difficult. Material models, which are crucial in metal-cutting simulations, are usually calibrated based on data from material testing. Nevertheless, the magnitudes of strains and strain rates involved in metal cutting are several orders of magnitude higher than those generated from conventional material testing. Therefore, a highly desirable feature is a material model that can be extrapolated outside the calibration range. In this study, a physically based plasticity model based on dislocation density and vacancy concentration is used to simulate orthogonal metal cutting of AISI 316L. The material model is implemented into an in-house particle finite-element method software. Numerical simulations are in agreement with experimental results, but also with previous results obtained with the finite-element method.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. Vol. 4, no 1, p. 35-51
National Category
Applied Mechanics Other Materials Engineering
Research subject
Solid Mechanics; Material Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3280DOI: 10.1007/s40571-016-0120-9ISI: 000417457300005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85026434550Local ID: 1162f8b7-aa09-4110-a750-247255072ce5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3280DiVA, id: diva2:976137
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved

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Rodriguez Prieto, Juan ManuelJonsén, PärSvoboda, Ales

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