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Energy transport in the thermosphere during the solar storms of April 2002
Science Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton.
AS&M Inc., Hampton.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6479-2236
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas.
Science Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton.
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 110, no A12, article id A12S25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dramatic solar storm events of April 2002 deposited a large amount of energy into the Earth's upper atmosphere, substantially altering the thermal structure, the chemical composition, the dynamics, and the radiative environment. We examine the flow of energy within the thermosphere during this storm period from the perspective of infrared radiation transport and heat conduction. Observations from the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite are coupled with computations based on the ASPEN thermospheric general circulation model to assess the energy flow. The dominant radiative response is associated with dramatically enhanced infrared emission from nitric oxide at 5.3 μm from which a total of ∼7.7 × 1023 ergs of energy are radiated during the storm. Energy loss rates due to NO emission exceed 2200 Kelvin per day. In contrast, energy loss from carbon dioxide emission at 15 μm is only ∼2.3% that of nitric oxide. Atomic oxygen emission at 63 μm is essentially constant during the storm. Energy loss from molecular heat conduction may be as large as 3.8% of the NO emission. These results confirm the “natural thermostat” effect of nitric oxide emission as the primary mechanism by which storm energy is lost from the thermosphere below 210 km.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 110, no A12, article id A12S25
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3448DOI: 10.1029/2005JA011141ISI: 000234296100003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33845674289Local ID: 1451bd76-2031-474d-ad2d-a64a401d4b61OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3448DiVA, id: diva2:976306
Note

Upprättat; 2005; 20150223 (ninhul)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved

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Martin-Torres, Javier

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