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Vehicular communications: Survey and challenges of channel and propagation models
Information and Communication Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok.
NEC Laboratories Europe, NEC Europe Ltd., Heidelberg.
Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Graduate Institute of Networking and Multimedia, National Taiwan University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1902-9877
2015 (English)In: IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine, ISSN 1556-6072, E-ISSN 1556-6080, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 55-66, article id 7108160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vehicular communication is characterized by a dynamic environment, high mobility, and comparatively low antenna heights on the communicating entities (vehicles and roadside units). These characteristics make vehicular propagation and channel modeling particularly challenging. In this article, we classify and describe the most relevant vehicular propagation and channel models, with a particular focus on the usability of the models for the evaluation of protocols and applications. We first classify the models based on the propagation mechanisms they employ and their implementation approach. We also classify the models based on the channel properties they implement and pay special attention to the usability of the models, including the complexity of implementation, scalability, and the input requirements (e.g., geographical data input). We also discuss the less-explored aspects in vehicular channel modeling, including modeling specific environments (e.g., tunnels, overpasses, and parking lots) and types of communicating vehicles (e.g., scooters and public transportation vehicles). We conclude by identifying the underresearched aspects of vehicular propagation and channel modeling that require further modeling and measurement studies

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10, no 2, p. 55-66, article id 7108160
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Mobile and Pervasive Computing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3475DOI: 10.1109/MVT.2015.2410341Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84930685363Local ID: 14db83c8-7b02-4e76-af2a-f0a6cfaf81a4OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3475DiVA, id: diva2:976333
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20150622 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Vasilakos, Athanasios

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