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Village electrification technologies: an evaluation of photovoltaic cells and compact fluorescent lamps and their applicability in rural villages based on a Tanzanian case study
Royal Institute of Technology, Avdelningen Byggnadsteknik.
Luleå tekniska universitet.
Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
2005 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1287-1298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electrification of remote sites in developing countries is often realised trough diesel generator sets and an electric distribution network. This was also the technology used in the village Urambo, where the first rural electrification co-operative in Tanzania was started in 1994. Climate change however calls for decreased fossil fuel combustion worldwide and new technologies have been further developed since the erection of the diesel generator sets in Urambo. It is therefore not obvious that electrification of other rural areas shall follow the Urambo example. In this article, the situation for 250 electricity consumers in Urambo will be demonstrated and the implications for them of introducing new technologies will be evaluated. Technology options regarded in the study are individual photovoltaic (PV) power systems and either incandescent lamps, tube lights or compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) supplied by diesel generation. The different options have been evaluated with respect to consumer costs and environmental impact. The results of the comparison show that PV generation is able to compete with diesel generation if combined with incandescent lamps, but not when tube lights or CFLs are used in the conventional supply system. It should be noted, however, that while the diesel option offer financially more attractive solutions, individual PV systems do not result in any CO2 emissions. Furthermore, PV systems normally have a higher reliability. However, since the diesel option is not only cheaper but also offers a wider range of energy services and facilitates, future connection to the national electric grid, the conclusion is that this is preferable before individual PV systems for communities similar to Urambo, if the consumers shall pay the full cost of the service.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1287-1298
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3489DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2003.12.005ISI: 000228206800006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-11244322015Local ID: 15200f60-cb26-11db-b3ed-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3489DiVA, id: diva2:976347
Note
Validerad; 2005; 20070203 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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