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Going from “paper and pen” to ICT systems: Perspectives on managing the change process
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2860-7459
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6330-2992
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3861-7298
Number of Authors: 4
2017 (English)In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 109-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lack of participation from staff when developing information and communication technologies (ICT) has been shown to lead to negative consequences and might be one explanation for failure. Management during development processes has rarely been empirically studied, especially when introducing ICT systems in a municipality context. Objective: To describe and interpret experiences of the management during change processes where ICT was introduced among staff and managers in elderly care. Design: A qualitative interpretive method was chosen for this study and content analysis for analyzing the interviews. Results: “Clear focus–unclear process” demonstrated that focus on ICT solutions was clear but the process of introducing the ICT was not. “First-line managers receiving a system of support” gave a picture of the first-line manager as not playing an active part in the projects. First-line managers and staff described “Low power to influence” when realizing that for some reasons, they had not contributed in the change projects. “Low confirmation” represented the previous and present feelings of staff not being listened to. Lastly, “Reciprocal understanding” pictures how first-line managers and staff, although having some expectations on each other, understood each other’s positions. Conclusions: Empowerment could be useful in creating an organization where critical awareness and reflection over daily practice becomes a routine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 42, no 2, p. 109-121
National Category
Nursing Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Nursing; Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3525DOI: 10.3109/17538157.2015.1033526ISI: 000396842500001PubMedID: 27715360Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84990181464Local ID: 15a306be-9c6d-4757-9d68-a682e234889bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3525DiVA: diva2:976383
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-20 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved

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Marchesoni, Maria AnderssonAxelsson, KarinFältholm, YlvaLindberg, Inger
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