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Self-care for minor illness
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8990-752X
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1682-8326
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7830-8791
2015 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe experiences with and knowledge of minor illness, self-care interventions used in minor illness and channels of information used when providing self-care for minor illness.Background: Although minor illness is self-limiting, symptoms can be substantial and have a great impact on the affected person’s wellbeing. Possibilities to seek and find information about health and self-care have significantly increased through internet-based communities, forums, and websites. Still, a considerable number of consultations with general practitioners are for conditions that are potentially self-treatable. Seeking advanced care for minor illnesses is costly for society and can create discomfort for patients as they are down-prioritized at emergency departments.Methods: Study participants were recruited randomly from the Swedish Adress Register. A questionnaire was sent out, and the final sample included 317 randomly selected persons aged 18–80 and living in Sweden.Findings: Having experienced a specific illness correlated with self-reported knowledge. Preferred self-care interventions differed between different conditions, but resting and self-medicating were commonly used, along with consulting health care facilities. Compliance to advice was the highest for official information channels, and family members were a popular source of advice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 16, no 1, p. 71-78
National Category
Nursing Physiotherapy
Research subject
Nursing; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3738DOI: 10.1017/S1463423613000522ISI: 000369919100010PubMedID: 24451047Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84973426683Local ID: 1921c3e7-d591-4ac6-bf97-0718bc662fcaOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3738DiVA, id: diva2:976598
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 1; 20140128 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, SiljeVikman, IreneAxelsson, KarinSävenstedt, Stefan

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