Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Modelling the hypsometric seasonal snow cover using meteorological parameters
Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment, Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Him Parisar, Sector-37A, Chandigarh.
Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment, Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Him Parisar, Sector-37A, Chandigarh.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2502-6384
Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment, Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Him Parisar, Sector-37A, Chandigarh.
Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment, Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Him Parisar, Sector-37A, Chandigarh, Geographical Information System Cell (GIS Cell), Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT), Allahabad.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Journal of Spatial Science, ISSN 1449-8596, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study established a decadal correlation between meteorological observations (temperature and snowfall) and satellite-derived seasonal snow cover for a glacier catchment. The study area was classified into 10 elevation zones. The time period for considering climatic variables was from the start of the significant fresh snowfall of the new season to the date of satellite image acquisition. The snowfall inputs from the five meteorological stations at different altitudes were interpolated for the entire catchment using a discretised thin-plate spline technique. A local temperature lapse rate for this specific time period was calculated. It was applied throughout the catchment for interpolating the temperature, which was further used to refine the interpolated snowfall. Such a hypsometric approach along with third-order polynomial curve fitting (R2=0.998) finally gave an equation for estimating percent snow-covered area for different elevation zones with a good accuracy and very low average RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) of 3.16 percent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 60, no 1, p. 51-64
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Atmospheric science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3918DOI: 10.1080/14498596.2014.943310Local ID: 1c450965-f8f6-4c2d-8eb4-b235079393b5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-3918DiVA, id: diva2:976780
Note
Upprättat; 2015; 20160630 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Bhardwaj, Anshuman

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bhardwaj, Anshuman
Aerospace Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 20 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf