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The extent of excessive or insufficient fundraising among US arts organizations and the effect of organizational efficiency on donations to US arts organizations
Auburn University Montgomery, Alabama.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing, ISSN 1465-4520, E-ISSN 1479-103X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We estimate, for each nonprofit organization (NPO) in a sample of 606 US arts NPOs, whether the NPO's level of fundraising is excessive, insufficient, or neither, relative to the level that maximizes net donations. We find that the effect of a 1% increase in fundraising on net donations varies widely across the arts NPOs in our sample - from an increase in net donations of 8.91% of gross donations to a decrease of 3.82% of gross donations. Of the 100 NPOs in our sample with the highest donations, the estimated effect of a 1% increase in fundraising on net donations varies more narrowly - from an increase in net donations of 0.27% of gross donations to a decrease of 0.32% of gross donations. Of these 100 NPOs, we estimate that only 3 engaged in excessive fundraising, but 83 engaged in insufficient fundraising, and 14 did not engage in excessive or insufficient fundraising.We also provide evidence that reported organizational efficiency does not affect donations to arts NPOs. This finding may be useful to managers and directors of US arts NPOs who believe that organizational efficiency does impact donations and who, therefore, incorporate the effect on efficiency in their decisions to allocate resources across fundraising, administration, and program objectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 12, no 3, p. 267-273
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Accounting and Control
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4090DOI: 10.1002/nvsm.305Local ID: 1f57ab70-a17f-11dc-ac39-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4090DiVA, id: diva2:976952
Note
Validerad; 2007; 20071203 (keni)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Jacobs, Fred

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  • apa
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