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Prospects for cleaning ash in the acidic effluent from bioleaching of sulfidic concentrates
Luleå tekniska universitet.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
2004 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 39-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leaching of ashes in sulfuric acid (pH 1.0, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio 10:1, 25 °C) has been characterized with respect to the neutralizing capacity and the dissolution of dominant ions and trace elements. The conditions mimic the oxidation stage of a biohydrometallurgical process for base metal production from sulfidic mineral concentrates. Direct acid leaching of ash, integrated with this metallurgical process, offers a feasible route to the sustainable handling of metal-rich ashes. The treated ash will be deposited together with the inert mineral residue. Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn are effectively leached and can be recovered utilizing existing hydrometallurgical technology, but the recovery of other readily dissolved metals, notably Mn, U and V, requires that additional steps are implemented. We make two recommendations for industrial processes. The first is to replace limestone with ash from biofuels, except peat, for pH control in biohydrometallurgical processing. This requires a modest increase of fresh alkali compared with limestone. The second is to implement sulfuric acid leaching of fly ash from the combustion of solid waste and other metal-rich fuels (used wood, tires), thereby avoiding costly ash-deposits. There is a significant economic incentive for these changes, since no costly ash-deposits and less limestone will be needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 106, no 1, p. 39-54
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Process Metallurgy; Fysik
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4111DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2003.08.013ISI: 000188955000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0346250802Local ID: 1fd355c0-8206-11db-aabe-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4111DiVA, id: diva2:976975
Note
Validerad; 2004; 20061202 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Sandström, ÅkePaul, Jan

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