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Transfemoral amputees' experiences of the first meeting and subsequent interactions with hospital staff
Lund University Hospital, Scandinavian Orthopaedic Laboratory.
University of Lund, Department of Physical Therapy.
2008 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 30, no 16, p. 1192-1203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. To describe, by use of a phenomenological approach, how transfemoral amputees experience their first meeting and subsequent interaction with hospital staff in the acute phase, in the long term and suggestions for future care-giving. Method. Eleven transfemoral amputees, median age 33.5 years, were interviewed. The amputations, performed in median 7.5 years before the interview, were caused by tumour, motorcycle accidents or work-related traumas. The participants were community dwelling and managed well indoors. All, except one, worked or studied full time. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Results. Three themes emerged: (i) Communication/information - limitations in preparing the patient for the new situation, (ii) empathy and emotional support, and (iii) ability to meet the need of individually tailored rehabilitation. For future care-giving three categories emerged: (i) Individually tailored communication/information, (ii) rehabilitation to be prepared to adapt to one's new situation, and (iii) support in regaining control. Conclusion. The participants expressed a need for both professional and emotional support in the acute phase. Over time they preferred a patient-centred approach which improved coping skills and facilitated their own ability to gain control. Increased awareness of how meeting and interacting with hospital staff influences rehabilitation processes may further improve patient satisfaction and outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 30, no 16, p. 1192-1203
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4247Local ID: 22aeac60-70b0-11dc-a60c-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4247DiVA, id: diva2:977111
Note
Upprättat; 2008; 20071002 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Gard, Gunvor

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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