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Experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma: preparing for the unexpected: a qualitative study
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5367-1751
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7388-069X
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6244-6401
Number of Authors: 4
2016 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 36, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

SummarySettings and objectivesA midsize hospital in the north of Sweden with a high-tech intensive care unit and space for up to 10 patients, with an attached postoperative ward for up to 15 patients. The wards are manned by critical care nurses who are also responsible for carrying a trauma pager. When the alarm goes off, the critical care nurse leaves her/his duties and joins a trauma team. The aim of the study was to describe critical care nurse's experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma.MethodA qualitative descriptive design was used. Data were collected through four focus group discussions with 15 critical care nurses analysed using qualitative content analysis.FindingsOne theme: Preparing for the unexpected with four subthemes: (1) Feeling competent, but sometimes inadequate; (2) Feeling unsatisfied with the care environment; (3) Feeling satisfied with well-functioning communication; and (4) Feeling a need to reflect when affected.ConclusionsNursing trauma patients require critical care nurses to be prepared for the unexpected. Two aspects of trauma care must be improved in order to fully address the challenges it poses: First, formal preparation and adequate resources must be invested to ensure delivery of quality trauma care. Secondly, follow-ups are needed to evaluate care measures and to give members of the trauma team the opportunity to address feelings of distress or concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 36, p. 58-65
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4356DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2016.04.002ISI: 000382343400009PubMedID: 27173952Local ID: 24aa183b-dabb-474e-bb25-6c57b6430be0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4356DiVA: diva2:977221
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160404 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved

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