Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A comprehensive model of entrepreneur role stress antecedents and consequences
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8770-8874
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6921-1779
2009 (English)In: Journal of business and psychology, ISSN 0889-3268, E-ISSN 1573-353X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 225-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The aim of this study was to systematize findings in role stress research into original and conceptually important abstract higher-order constructs and to develop and test a comprehensive structural equation model that examined such expanded conceptualizations of antecedents and consequences to entrepreneur role stress. Design/Methodology/Approach Model tests were performed on data from a sample of 282 Swedish entrepreneurs (a usable rate of 22.5%) engaged in their first-year of venture activities. We used structural equation modeling, mediation tests and tests for common method bias to test the appropriateness of the model. Findings We found that role stress can be explained by expansions of lower-ranked, less abstract constructs embedded in a multiple-indicator model of venture technology, venture environment, and entrepreneur personality. The analysis confirmed that role stress is an important mediator and that it has pronounced relationships to expanded conceptualizations of role-related rewards and exhaustion. Implications This study advance role stress theory and existing knowledge about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship when it introduces role stress and suggests it mediates the effects from personality traits, organizational and environmental characteristics, on higher-order conceptualizations of rewards and exhaustion. Originality/Value With contributions from several distinct disciplines over a half decade, prior research has not paid much attention to show how role stress research can benefit from more abstract conceptualizations and empirical evaluation. By synthesizing and developing expanded higher-level conceptualizations that link diversities, we show that expanded conceptualizations effectively enable to introduce role stress to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 24, no 2, p. 225-243
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4380DOI: 10.1007/s10869-009-9102-8ISI: 000266496800010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84864151964Local ID: 2522d5b0-34d2-11de-98cd-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4380DiVA, id: diva2:977245
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20090429 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Wincent, JoakimÖrtqvist, Daniel

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wincent, JoakimÖrtqvist, Daniel
By organisation
Innovation and Design
In the same journal
Journal of business and psychology
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 43 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf