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From a Dualistic Toward a Holistic View of Dance Knowledge: A Phenomenological Analysis of Syllabuses in Upper Secondary Schools in Sweden
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1114-9746
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9266-786X
2015 (English)In: Journal of Dance Education, ISSN 1529-0824, E-ISSN 2158-074X, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

DANCE AS...BACKGROUNDA PHENOMENOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVEPHENOMENOLOGICAL TEXT ANALYSISDANCE KNOWLEDGE AS EXPRESSED IN LPF94DANCE KNOWLEDGE AS IT APPEARS IN GY11DISCUSSION.This article examines how dance knowledge is seen through syllabuses in Swedish upper secondary schools. A starting point is life-world phenomenology. A phenomenological way of thinking allows that human beings are intersubjective, linked with and within the world, which influences the view of dance knowledge and how research is elaborated. A basic rule and starting point for research within phenomenology is to turn toward the things themselves and to be adherent. Dance knowledge constitutes the phenomenon studied, as revealed in dance syllabus steering documents. Spiegelberg’s philosophical method is used as a base for phenomenological text analysis. The study is limited to syllabuses from two different curricula, labeled by The Swedish National Agency for Education as Lpf94 and Gy11. The analysis results in two images of how the essence of dance knowledge is manifested. Finally, the different constitutions are discussed and related to a life-world phenomenological view of dance knowledge.Summer wind subsides, the freshly cut lawn is replaced with the springiness of the floor of my dance studio, and my books are replaced with lesson plans and syllabuses. It’s time for the term to start. I realize that I am involved in many different courses this year and, in addition, there are new syllabuses with new goals and knowledge requirements, but is dance still dance? I have read the new syllabuses in Gy11, and what I usually do in my teaching can be linked to the syllabuses’ content. So what is new, according to the new syllabuses that my students should face? Does it require anything else of me as a teacher than it did before? As I said, the courses start now and the time to familiarize myself with the documents is limited, so I let the dance conduct me in the jungle of words and letters.This article presents a study with the research focus on assessment within the specialist dance programs in upper secondary schools and specifically how dance knowledge is seen through syllabuses in Swedish upper secondary schools. Teachers in upper secondary schools have to relate to steering documents, which include laws and guidelines for school activity. The steering documents specify what students should learn, for example, in the form of goals and grading criteria. Therefore, formulations in the steering documents have consequences for the content and structure of what is taught. In the higher grades of the Swedish school system, the teacher evaluates the students and must know what knowledge needs to be assessed. The purpose of this study isto analyze and describe dance knowledge as a phenomenon based on how it appears and is seen by the researchers through syllabuses used in upper secondary schools in the period 2011–2012. The documents are studied with a phenomenological method of text analysis, and the results are related to a life-world phenomenological way of thinking about knowledge and learning.One challenge for teachers is to relate to goals and achievement-level criteria that encourage and value holistic learning processes and at the same time encourage feelings of “I can dance” among students. The challenge concerns taking into account different dimensions of dance knowledge and the variety of possible types of dance experience. To be able to relate actively to steering documents requires a prior understanding of how to express performed achievements. We ask ourselves this: How is dance knowledge expressed in current steering documents and what dimensions of dance knowledge are included?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-11
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education; Music Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4436DOI: 10.1080/15290824.2014.952007Local ID: 260fd6e3-4def-4aab-a7c7-3fe9a4898ca8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4436DiVA, id: diva2:977309
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 1; 20150317 (ninand)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, NinnieFerm, Cecilia

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