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Believing Androids?: fMRI activation in the right temporo-parietal junction is modulated by ascribing intentions to non-human agents
Department of Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels.
Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. Chair for Cognitive Systems, Technische Universität München.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3323-7357
Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich.
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2017 (English)In: Social Neuroscience, ISSN 1747-0919, E-ISSN 1747-0927, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 582-593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Attributing mind to interaction partners has been shown to increase the social relevance we ascribe to others’ actions and to modulate the amount of attention dedicated to them. However, it remains unclear how the relationship between higher-order mind attribution and lower-level attention processes is established in the brain. In this neuroimaging study, participants saw images of an anthropomorphic robot that moved its eyes left- or rightwards to signal the appearance of an upcoming stimulus in the same (valid cue) or opposite location (invalid cue). Independently, participants’ beliefs about the intentionality underlying the observed eye movements were manipulated by describing the eye movements as under human control or preprogrammed. As expected, we observed a validity effect behaviorally and neurologically (increased response times and activation in the invalid vs. valid condition). More importantly, we observed that this effect was more pronounced for the condition in which the robot’s behavior was believed to be controlled by a human, as opposed to be preprogrammed. This interaction effect between cue validity and belief was, however, only found at the neural level and was manifested as a significant increase of activation in bilateral anterior temporoparietal junction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017. Vol. 12, no 5, p. 582-593
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4518DOI: 10.1080/17470919.2016.1207702ISI: 000405614900010PubMedID: 27391213Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84984889814Local ID: 27510919-93ee-4046-a7f5-8827f4c34aaaOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4518DiVA, id: diva2:977392
Note

Validerad;2017;Nivå 2;2017-08-11 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Wykowska, Agnieszka

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