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A comparative study on properties of micro and nanopapers produced from cellulose and cellulose nanofibres
CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing, Polymers and Composites Competence Area, Nonwovens and Composites Research Group, P.O. Box 1124, 4 Gomery Avenue, Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth.
CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing, Polymers and Composites Competence Area, Nonwovens and Composites Research Group, P.O. Box 1124, 4 Gomery Avenue, Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8909-3554
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4762-2854
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2015 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 118, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) were successfully extracted from cellulose obtained from maize stalk residues. A variety of techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used for characterization and the experimental results showed that lignin and hemicellulose were removed to a greater extent by following the chemical methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed that the diameters of CNCs and CNFs were ranging from 3 to 7 nm and 4 to10 nm, respectively, with their lengths in micro scale. CNCs suspension showed a flow of birefringence, however, the same was not observed in the case of suspension containing CNFs. XRD analysis confirmed that CNCs had high crystallinity index in comparison to cellulose and CNFs. Nanopapers were prepared from CNCs and CNFs by solvent evaporation method. Micropapers were also prepared from cellulose pulp by the same technique. Nanopapers made from CNFs showed less transparency as compared to nanopapers produced from CNCs whereas high transparency as compared to micropaper. Nanopapers produced from CNFs provided superior mechanical properties as compared to both micropaper and nanopapers produced from CNCs. Also, nanopapers produced from CNFs were thermally more stable as compared to nanopapers produced from CNCs but thermally less stable as compared to micropapers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 118, p. 1-8
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4757DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.10.007ISI: 000348259900001PubMedID: 25542099Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84912033610Local ID: 2bec033b-2e51-4318-a727-b63acaa15ee3OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4757DiVA, id: diva2:977631
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20141021 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Mathew, Aji P.Oksman, Kristiina

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