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Recognition of knowledge and skills at work: in whose interests?
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Work-place learning takes place in many settings and in different ways, resulting in knowledge and skills of different kinds. The recognition process in the work place is however often implicit and seldom discussed in terms of recognition of prior learning (RPL). The aim of this paper is to give examples of how the knowledge/skills of employees get recognition in the workplace and to discuss what the consequences of such recognition processes might be. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a study in two companies and two municipalities, where 21 interviews were conducted with human resource managers, team leaders and union representatives. The research questions concerned the ways skills were recognised among employees and how the logics of these actions could be understood. Findings – The findings show that both companies and municipalities have their own ways of assessing knowledge/skills, mostly out of a production logic of what is needed at the workplace. However, certain skills are also made “unvisualised” for the employee. This employer-controlled recognition logic is important to understand when RPL models are brought to the work place in order to obtain win-win situations for both employers and employees. Practical implications – It seems important to identify an already existing system for assessment of knowledge/skills at the workplace when bringing RPL processes to the workplace. Originality/value – The approach to understand assessment processes in these companies and municipalities from an RPL perspective has not been widely covered before.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 24, no 2, p. 73-84
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment; Human Work Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4885DOI: 10.1108/13665621211201670Local ID: 2e33b79a-1d2d-4088-a02e-ef4d2905fe0cOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4885DiVA: diva2:977759
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120307 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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