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Fat, Oil, and Grease Accumulation in Sewer Systems: Comprehensive Survey of Experiences of Scandinavian Municipalities
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9541-3542
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1725-6478
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5548-4397
2014 (English)In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 140, no 3, article id 4014003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problems with fat, oil, and grease (FOG) in sewer systems have received relatively little attention, although in the longer term this might imply (inter alia) blockages and sanitary overflows. Therefore, the experiences of Swedish and Norwegian executive water engineers concerning FOG-related issues were assessed using a comprehensive questionnaire that was distributed to all Swedish and Norwegian municipalities (with a response rate of 35% and 25% in Sweden and Norway, respectively). Blockages caused by FOG in sewers and pumping stations were the most prevalent reported problem, followed by increased demand for line flushing. The water engineers singled out city centers as the areas whose sewers had the most severe problems with FOG buildups. Most municipalities mandated the use of grease interceptors (GIs) by businesses, but the maintenance and functional status of these devices were reported to be inadequate. Commonly, water engineers had faith in the functioning of the GI despite the lack of stringent inspections. Where FOG collection systems had been implemented, they generally targeted businesses and other enterprises rather than private households. Because problems caused by FOG buildups are likely to become more common in the future, it is important that prevention strategies characterize management to a higher degree than ones based on removal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 140, no 3, article id 4014003
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5272DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-7870.0000813Local ID: 354abeb3-3d4a-4713-b8be-b6918b19e0c5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-5272DiVA: diva2:978146
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140121 (jonmat)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Mattsson, JonathanHedström, AnnelieViklander, MariaBlecken, Godecke-Tobias
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