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Estimation of the risk for early thermal cracking for SCC containing fly ash
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
2012 (English)In: Materials and Structures, ISSN 1359-5997, E-ISSN 1871-6873, Vol. 45, no 1-2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cracking of concrete must be avoided during the hardening phase in order to minimize the risk of durability problems in the future, such as corrosion of the reinforcement, water tightness and damages due to frost. Estimation of the risk of early age cracking requires knowledge of the combined effects from temperature development and mechanical behaviour during the hydration. In the present paper, the influence of fly ash on the young concrete behaviour has been investigated. The concrete is based on a Swedish cement aimed for civil engineering structures, and the fly ash is of class F. A comparison of crack risks between concrete containing fly ash in different amounts with concrete without fly ash is presented. Also a previously tested concrete containing limestone filler is considered. The fly ash was added to replace a part of the aggregate, which gives a higher heat evolution. However, a numerical stress analysis showed that the risk for early age through cracking for a typical civil engineering structure is significantly decreased in the mixes containing fly ash. The denotation typical civil engineering structure is used here for concrete structures such as tunnels, bridges, and ramps of common cross-section dimensions. In the case of fly ash added to concrete by a partial replacement of cement, the crack risk will probably be further decreased. For a self-balancing structure of young concrete there is no restraint from adjacent structures, and the temperature and moisture gradients within the young concrete cause self-stresses governed by equilibrium with zero external forces for any cut. The estimated risk for surface cracking on a self-balancing wall or slab was not improved by an addition of fly ash. It is probably an effect of the increased heat development, which most likely counteracts the positive effect of the increased early age creep for concrete containing fly ash. If the heat evolution decreases when cement is partly replaced with fly ash, the use of fly ash might reduce the risk of surface cracks

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 45, no 1-2, p. 153-169
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Research subject
Structural Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5556DOI: 10.1617/s11527-011-9757-2ISI: 000297810900012Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84861661340Local ID: 3aedec02-4a23-4bde-8c3d-c481b28bef2fOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-5556DiVA, id: diva2:978430
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20110411 (jej)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Utsi, SofiaJonasson, Jan-Erik

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