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Production of biodegradable polyesters via enzymatic polymerization and solid state finishing
Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
Laboratory of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 19, article id 40820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The synthesis of aliphatic polyesters (PEs) derived from diols (1,4-butanediol and 1,8-octanediol) and diacids or their derivatives (diethyl succinate, sebacic acid, 1,12-dodecanedioic acid, and 1,14-tetradecanedioic acid) was achieved in order to produce poly(butylene succinate) (PE 4.4), poly(octylene sebacate) (PE 8.10), poly(octylene dodecanate) (PE 8.12), and poly(octylene tetradecanate) (PE 8.14). The herein suggested procedure involved two stages, both sustainable and in accordance with the principles of "green" polymerization. The first comprised an enzymatic prepolymerization under vacuum, in the presence of diphenylether as solvent using Candida antarctica lipase B as biocatalyst, whereas a low-temperature postpolymerization step [solid state polymerization (SSP)] followed in order to upgrade the PEs quality. In the enzymatically synthesized prepolymers, the range of number-average molecular weight attained was from 3700 to 8000 g/mol with yields reaching even 97%. Subsequently, SSP of PE 4.4 and 8.12 took place under vacuum or flowing nitrogen and lasted 10-48 h, at temperatures close to the prepolymer melting point (Tm -  TSSP varied between 4°C and 14°C). The solid state finishing led to increase in the molecular weight depending on the prepolymer type, and it also contributed to improvement of the physical characteristics and the thermal properties of the enzymatically synthesized PEs

Abstract [en]

The synthesis of aliphatic polyesters (PEs) derived from diols (1,4-butanediol and 1,8-octanediol) and diacids or their derivatives (diethyl succinate, sebacic acid, 1,12-dodecanedioic acid, and 1,14-tetradecanedioic acid) was achieved in order to produce poly(butylene succinate) (PE 4.4), poly(octylene sebacate) (PE 8.10), poly(octylene dodecanate) (PE 8.12), and poly(octylene tetradecanate) (PE 8.14). The herein suggested procedure involved two stages, both sustainable and in accordance with the principles of “green” polymerization. The first comprised an enzymatic prepolymerization under vacuum, in the presence of diphenylether as solvent using Candida antarctica lipase B as biocatalyst, whereas a low-temperature postpolymerization step [solid state polymerization (SSP)] followed in order to upgrade the PEs quality. In the enzymatically synthesized prepolymers, the range of number–average molecular weight attained was from 3700 to 8000 g/mol with yields reaching even 97%. Subsequently, SSP of PE 4.4 and 8.12 took place under vacuum or flowing nitrogen and lasted 10–48 h, at temperatures close to the prepolymer melting point (Tm − TSSP varied between 4°C and 14°C). The solid state finishing led to increase in the molecular weight depending on the prepolymer type, and it also contributed to improvement of the physical characteristics and the thermal properties of the enzymatically synthesized PEs

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 131, no 19, article id 40820
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-5709DOI: 10.1002/app.40820ISI: 000340238300008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904564486Local ID: 3e0c1ab4-3d9f-4e5d-9059-3df8693e7016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-5709DiVA, id: diva2:978583
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140315 (pauchr)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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